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Newlyn Fishing-20.jpg

The crabber 'William Harvey'.

After making the three hour journey to the area surrounding Wolf Rock lighthouse, which is approximately eight miles off Lands End, the three man crew of the 'William Harvey' cast out the crab pots, after they have been hauled in and emptied.

The crabs are mainly female and are taken back to Newlyn the same day, where they are stored in sea water holding tanks for a short period of time before they are processed.

Shellfishing does not damage the environment and anything caught that isn't big enough is returned to the sea alive to carry on breeding.

W. Harvey & Sons, who own the boat and processing sites in Newlyn, are the UK's largest shellfish provider.
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Copying of this Image by any means or by persons other than the copyright owner, Vince Bevan, is in breach of Copyright and is an offence under the 1988 Copyright Act, unless licence has been granted.
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Contained in galleries
Newlyn: Fishing for a Living
The crabber 'William Harvey'.<br />
<br />
After making the three hour journey to the area surrounding Wolf Rock lighthouse, which is approximately eight miles off Lands End, the three man crew of the 'William Harvey' cast out the crab pots, after they have been hauled in and emptied.<br />
<br />
The crabs are mainly female and are taken back to Newlyn the same day, where they are stored in sea water holding tanks for a short period of time before they are processed.<br />
<br />
Shellfishing does not damage the environment and anything caught that isn't big enough is returned to the sea alive to carry on breeding.<br />
<br />
W. Harvey & Sons, who own the boat and processing sites in Newlyn, are the UK's largest shellfish provider.